Questions & Answers

Have a question regarding something you saw — or maybe didn’t see — on this site? Take a moment to browse the FAQ section below and you may find just what you’re looking for.

Q

What is the Partnership for Success Project?

A

The purpose of the Nebraska Strategic Prevention Framework Partnership for Success Project is to reduce underage drinking among persons aged 12–20, with a special focus on the reduction of binge drinking within this population.

Q

What is the Lancaster Prevention Coalition?

A

The Lancaster Prevention Coalition is a partnership consisting of nine Lincoln and Lancaster County community groups working together to reduce risky alcohol-related behavior, such as underage drinking, binge drinking, and drinking and driving, and empower parents to be active in prevention efforts.

Q

How can I get involved in my local community or school group?

A

If you’re ready to take action against underage drinking and make a difference in your community, simply scroll up to find the contact information for the Community Group or Partner nearest you. Quick and easy!

Q

My teen may have an issue with drinking. Where can I go for help?

A

To learn more about what you can do, go to our Resources page and check out our Heart-to-Heart toolkit and other proven prevention programs and resources. Or scroll up to connect with trusted community leaders who can provide even more help and answers.

If your teen is in need of immediate assistance from an alcohol or drug treatment professional, contact Nebraska Family Helpline at 1-888-866-8660.

Q

Is underage drinking really an issue in Nebraska?

A

According to the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS), from 2007 to 2011, the prevalence of underage drinking among Nebraska youth rose 6% while the national rate fell 6%. Fortunately, recent findings suggest underage drinking among Nebraska youth is reflecting the national average. However, a problem still exists.

For example, according to a 2014 survey coordinated by the Nebraska Department of Education (NDE) and NDHHS, 60% of Nebraska high school seniors reported drinking alcohol in their lifetime, and 30% admitted to drinking alcohol within the past 30 days. Furthermore, 69% of respondents state it’s easy for them to illegally obtain alcohol.

Even more troubling, when asked, 16% of Nebraska high school seniors admitted to riding in a vehicle driven by someone who had been drinking within the past 30 days – this, despite the fact that 96% of those high school seniors agreed that driving after drinking alcohol is wrong.

Q

Where did the parenting style names and classifications come from?

A

In the mid-1960s, leading clinical and developmental psychologist Diana Baumrind released two studies regarding the effects that different parenting styles have on child rearing. The studies, which gained high acclaim, introduced the public to three parenting styles — authoritative, authoritarian and permissive.

Seventeen years later, in 1983, two psychologists, Eleanor Maccoby and John Martin, refined Baumrind’s parenting model and added a fourth parenting style — uninvolved. Since its release, Maccoby and Martin’s four-parenting-style theory has become the universally accepted classification of normal (non-abusive and non-neglectful) parents.

Q

Where did the conclusion that authoritative parenting helps to reduce underage drinking come from?

A

In 2010, the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs published a study by Stephen Bahr and John Hoffmann, two Brigham Young University professors. The study found that adolescents with authoritative parents were less likely to drink heavily than adolescents whose parents utilized the other three parenting styles. The study also found that adolescents raised by authoritative parents were more likely to have non-drinking friends.

Then, in 2012, a study was released showing that adolescents who have friends with authoritative mothers are 40% less likely to drink to the point of drunkenness and 38% less likely to binge-drink than an adolescent whose friend’s mother was uninvolved, controlling for the parenting style of the adolescent’s own mother, school-level fixed effects and demographics.

Q

Where can I go to learn more about parenting styles?

A

First, be sure to visit the Resources page where you can find the Heart-to-Heart toolkit, as well as a collection of other proven prevention programs and resources. Or take a moment to browse our References page to see all of the research and studies we used throughout the campaign.

Still have a question? Connect with us here and we’ll help you find the answers you’re looking for!